Approval Details

Valid E.O.

Validity

This Executive Order approved the specified parts on on November 13, 2001.
As of Sunday, September 22nd, 2019 this Executive Order has not been overturned or superceeded.

Approved Parts

Models
2001-2002 DaimlerChrysler 2.4, 3.3, and 3.8 L gasoline and flexible fuel ethanol minivans, originally equipped with a 20-gallon plastic fuel tank.

This Executive Order may be listed as:
  • C.A.R.B.E.O. D-461-3
  • Executive Order 461-3 / D461-3
  • ARB # D-461-3
  • Executive Order No: D-461-3
  • C.A.R.B. No. D-461-3
  • Resolution D-461-3
For Free CARB Executive Order Status verification, email an image of the device Executive Order label as well as the Year/Make/Model and Test Group # of the vehicle to [email protected]

Download: Executive Order D-461-3 PDF

D-461-3 Document:



                                    State of California
                                AIR RESOURCES BOARD

                               EXECUTIVE ORDER D—461—3

                              Relating to Exemptions under
                            Section 27156 of the Vehicle Code

                            Independent Mobility Systems, Inc.
                             Replacement Fuel Tank System

 Pursuant to the authority vested in the Air Resources Board (ARB) by Section 27156 of
‘the Vehicle Code; and

Pursuant to the authority vested in the undersigned by Sections 39515 and 39516 of the
Health and Safety Code and Executive Order G—45—9;

IT IS ORDERED AND RESOLVED: That installation of the replacement fuel tank system,
manufactured by Independent Mobility Systems, Inc. (IMS) of 4100 W. Piedras Street,
Farmington, New Mexico 87401, has been found not to reduce the effectiveness of the
applicable vehicle pollution control system, and therefore, the replacement fuel tank system
is exempt from the prohibitions of Section 27156 of the Vehicle Code for installation on
2001 and 2002 model—year DaimlerChrysler Corporation 2.4, 3.3, and 3.8 liter gasoline and
flexible fuel ethanol minivans, originally equipped with a 20—gallon plastic fuel tank.

This exemption is based on On—Board Refueling Vapor Recovery (ORVR) and
On—Board Diagnostic If (ODB 11 systemm test results submitted by IMS. Based on
evaluation of ORVR emission data and OBD II system test results, it was concluded that
IMS‘s replacement fuel tank system does not adversely affect the vehicle‘s refueling
emissions or reduce the effectiveness of its OBD I! system. in addition, based on
engineering evaluation of previous fuel tank temperature data, it was also concluded
that the replacement fuel tank system would not adversely affect the vehicle‘s
evaporative emissions.

Exemption of the replacement fuel tank system shall not be construed as an exemption to
sell, offer for sale, or advertise any component of the replacement fuel tank system as
individual devices.

This Executive Order shall not apply to any device advertised, offered for sale, sold with, or
instalied on a motor vehicle prior to or concurrent with transfer to an ultimate purchaser.

This Executive Order is valid provided that installation instructions for the replacement
fuel tank system do not recommend tuning the vehicle to specifications different from
those of the vehicle manufacturer.

Changes made to the design or operating conditions of the replacement fuel tank
system, as exempt by the ARB, which adversely affect the performance of the vehicle‘s
pollution control system shall invalidate this Executive Order.


   :                                            —2—

Marketing of the replacement fuel tank sysfem using an identification other than that
shown in this Executive Order or for an application other than those listed in this
Executive Order shall be prohibited unless prior approval is obtained from the ARB.

In addition to the foregoing, the ARB reserves the right in the future to review this
Executive Order and the exemption provided herein to assure that the exempted add—on
or modified part continues to meet the standards and procedures of Title 13, California
Code of Regulations, Section 2222 et seq.

 This Executive Order does not constitute any opinion as to the effect the use of the
‘replacement fuel tank system may have on any warranty either expressed or implied by
 the vehicle manufacturer.

No claim of any kind, such as "Approved by the Air Resources Board," may be made
with respect to the action taken herein in any advertising or other oral or written
communication.

THIS EXECUTIVE ORDER DOES NOT CONSTITUTE A CERTIFICATION,
ACCREDITATION, APPROVAL, OR ANY OTHER TYPE OF ENDORSEMENT BY THE
AIR RESOURCES BOARD OF CLAIMS OF THE APPLICANT CONCERNING
ANTI—POLLUTION BENEFITS OR ANY ALLEGED BENEFITS OF INDEPENDENT
MOBILITY SYSTEMS, INC.‘S REPLACEMENT FUEL TANK SYSTEM.

Violation of any of the above conditions shall be grounds for revocation of this Executive
Order. The Executive Order may be revoked only after a ten—day written notice of
intention to revoke the Executive Order, in which period the holder of the Executive
Order may request in writing a hearing to contest the proposed revocation. If a hearing
is requested, it shall be held within ten days of receipt of the request, and the Executive
Order may not be revoked until a determination is made after a hearing that grounds for
revocation exist.
                                                AAh
Executed at El Monte, California, this     [J         day of November 2001.




                                     J&nmerfield, Chief
                                         Mobite Source Operations Division




                     INDEPENDENT MOBILITY SYSTEMS, INC.
                   REPLACEMENT FUEL TANK SYSTEM — D—461—3


                                                            (For Internal ARB Use Only)

                                EVALUATION SUMMARY

Manufacturer Name: Independent Mobility Systems, Inc.

Name of Device: Replacement Fuel Tank System

Background:
        independent Moblllty Systems, Inc. (IMS) of 4100 W. Piedras Street, Farmington,
New Mexico 87401 has applied for an exemption from the prohibitions in Section 27156
of the California Vehicle Code (VC) for its replacement fuel tank system. The
replacement fuel tank is designed for use on 2001 and 2002 model—year
DaimierChrysler Corporation 2.4, 3.3, and 3.8 liter gasoline and flexible fuel ethanol
minivans. These vehicles are —certified to low and ultra—low emission vehicle exhaust
emission standards, enhanced evaporative emission standards, and On—Board
Refueling Vapor Recovery (ORVR) emission standard. They are also subject to the
On—Board Diagnostic II (OBD II) system regulations.

Recommendation:
      Grant exemption to IMS as requested and issue Executive Order D—461—3.

Device Description:
         IMS‘s replacement fuel tank system allows lowering of the van floor for wheel
chair access. Installation of IMS‘s fuel tank requires replacing the stock      .
20—gallon mid—ship plastic (high density polyethylene) fuel tank with IMS‘s 22—gallon
aft—of—axle HDPE plastic fuel tank. IMS‘s replacement fuel tank system also includes
replacement fuel and emission lines with a pressure and permeation rating equivalent to
that of the stock lines (high pressure/low permeation SAE 30—R9). The rollover valve
and ORVR emission control valves are replaced with OEM—quality valves. The stock
emission canister assembly is retained but moved forward from under the driver‘s seat
to directly underneath the rack and pinion steering rack. The stock fuel pump/sending
unit, filler tube, and gas cap are also retained. Installation of the replacement fuel tank
does not require any modifications to the stock motor or exhaust emission control
systems.

Discussion/Basis for the Recommendation:;
        The exemption is based on ORVR emissions and OBD it system test results
submitted by IMS. The exemption is also based on engineering evaluation of the
impact on exhaust and evaporative emissions. Since no modification is made to the
vehicle‘s exhaust emission control system, the staff concluded that installation of the
replacement fuel tank would not have any adverse effect on the exhaust emissions of
the applicable vehicles (gasoline or flexible fuel ethanol vehicles).
         To evaluate the impact on evaporative emissions, the staff considered the fuel
tank temperature profile IMS previously generated on its replacement fuel tank using
gasoline. On a 1998 model—year 3.8 fiter Town and Country minivan, IMS generated
the liquid fuel temperature profile of its 20—galion replacement fuel tank and compared it
to the temperature profile of the stock fuel tamk (obtained from DaimlerChrysler). The
data showed that the liquid fuel temperatures in the replacement fuel tank were slightly
lower than the temperatures in the stock fuel tank (the difference in temperatures (0—9
degrees Fahrenheit) was attributed to the different fuel tank locations, mid—ship for stock
tank and aft—of—axle for replacement tank). As a result, the amount of vapor generated


                                                                   {For Internal ARB Use Only)

in the two tanks was expected to be comparable. Based on this, the staff concluded
that IMS‘s replacement fuel tank would have a negligible effect on the vehicle‘s gasoline
evaporative emissions. No major changes have been made to either the stock or IMS‘s
fuel tank systems (fuel tank material or location; an increase in tank capacity from 20 to
22 gallons is not expected to cause an increase in fuel tank temperature) since the 1998
model. Therefore, the same result is expected on the 2001 and 2002 model—year
gasoline minivans.
        With all fuel tank components remaining the same except the change in fuel from
gasoline to ethanol, the same trend in fuel tank temperature profiles is expected—
temperature of ethanol in the replacement fuel tank is expected to remain below the
temperature of ethanol in the stock fuel tank. Therefore, IMS‘s replacement fuel tank is
not expected to have any adverse effect on the evaporative emissions of the ethanol
minivans.                       —
        To evaluate the impact on refueling emissions, a 2001 model—year Grand
Caravan (test group 1CRXTO03.32DT ; evaporative family 1CRXRO165XAA; fuel type
E85 ethanol or gasoline; 174 miles) with IMS‘s replacement fuel tank was tested at
Automotive Testing Laboratories, Inc. (ATL) in Mesa, Arizona. The vehicle was tested
using Phase !I Cleaner Burning Gasoline. ATL reported the following refueling emission
results:

                 ORVR Emissions               Test          DF        Standard

        Grams/Gallon of Dispensed Fuel        0.01          0.02        0.20


The gasoline refueling emission results showed that the vehicle modified with IMS‘s
replacement fuel tank would not exceed the applicable standard over the usefult life of
the vehicle. Since thetest vehicle had less than 4,000 miles, there was a concern that
the emission canisters had not gone through a sufficient number of vapor load and
purge cycles and might not be stable. Prior to testing, IMS replaced the emission
canisters on the test vehicle with canisters that had been in use for over 17,000 miles
on another 2001 Grand Caravan. All testing was conducted with the replacement
canisters.
       To evaluate the impact on ethanol refueling emissions, the staff compared IMS‘s
test data to DaimlerChrysler‘s certification emission data. The table below compares
the emissions:

        No.                          Fuel     ORVR Emissions            ORVR Standard

         1            IMS          Gasoline          0.03                      0.20

         2       DaimlerChrysler   Gasoline          0.03                      0.20

         3       DaimlerChrysler   Ethanol           0.04                      0.20


IMS‘s gasoline refueling emissions are the same as DaimlerChrysler‘s certification
emissions for gasoline minivans. With all the emission—related fuel tank components
remaining the same except the change in fuel from gasoline to ethanol, a similar result
can be expected. Using DaimlerChrysler‘s certification emissions for ethanol minivans,
ethanol refueling emissions for IMS‘s system are expected to be approximately 0.04


                                                            (For Internal ARB Use Only)

grams/gallon, far below the standard. The staff concludes that IMS‘s fuel tank would
 not have any adverse impact on the refueling emissions of the ethanol minivans.
         Using the same 2001 Grand Caravan, ATL tested the OBD II system leak
diagnostics. The testing required ATL to place a 0.020—inch diameter leak in the
vehicle‘s evaporative system and operate the vehicle to ensure that the leak is detected
 by the OBD II system. The leak test was required in two locations — once in the filler
tube gas cap and once in the purge line between the purge solenoid and the emission
canister. ATL reported that the system detected the 0.020—inch leak when it was
introduced into both the gas cap and the purge line. The leak tests were performed with
the fuel level at approximately 50 percent. ATL verified leak detection by checking for
the PO456 (small leak) diagnostic trouble code (DTC) in the on—board computer using a
scantool. Alf readiness indicators had set to complete and no other DTC‘s were set
throughout testing.             —
        The gasoline minivans use the same OBD i1 monitoring strategies as the ethanol
minivans; therefore, gasoline minivans modified with IMS‘s fuel tank are also expected
to detect a small leak in their evaporative systems.
        Based on the above, the staff concludes that IMS‘s replacement fuel tank system
would not have any adverse impact on the exhaust emissions, evaporative emissions,
refueling emissions, or the OBD If system of 2001 and 2002 (carry—over from 2001)
model—year 2.4, 3.3, and 3.8 liter DaimlerChrysler gasoline and flexible fuel ethanol
minivans, originally equipped with a 20—gallon plastic fuel tank. Therefore, the staff
concludes that IMS‘s replacement fuel tank system meets the requirements for a VC
27156 exemption for the vehicles listed in the Executive Order.



Document Created: 2005-09-01 12:41:45
Document Modified: 2005-09-01 12:41:45

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